3.8 Hot Topic: Mission Profile Aware Design - The Solution for Successful Design of Tomorrows Automotive Electronics

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Date: Tuesday 25 March 2014
Time: 14:30 - 16:00
Location / Room: Exhibition Theatre

Organisers:
Goeran Jerke, Robert Bosch GmbH, DE
Oliver Bringmann, University of Tuebingen, DE

Chair:
Goeran Jerke, Robert Bosch GmbH, DE

Co-Chair:
Oliver Bringmann, University of Tuebingen, DE

In order to benefit from modern automotive semiconductor technologies, application robustness must now be considered as a design target. This includes the consequent consideration of environmental stress conditions and functional loads, which are formalized in so-called "mission profiles". We introduce the motivation to use mission profiles from an OEM and Tier n perspective. Additionally, we introduce the mission profile aware design flow and present several application scenarios.

TimeLabelPresentation Title
Authors
14:303.8.1MISSION PROFILES - SOLUTION OR CHALLENGE? THE OEM PERSPECTIVE
Speaker:
Ulrich Abelein, AUDI AG, DE
Abstract
The original equipment manufacturer (OEM) is driven by its own quality and innovation goals to imple-ment the newest available and suitable semiconductor technologies. In this talk the OEM perspective with regard to mission profiles will be presented and discussed. The difference between the current use of standard sets of requirements and a mission profile approach will be evaluated. This will be demon-strated by actual and upcoming challenges in the automotive industry. Therefore the use of up-to-date technologies in accordance with declining maturing and product development times has to be consid-ered. Mission profiles become increasingly important as they provide the opportunity to cover these re-quirements. A necessary step to assemble a mission profile is the derivation of all relevant functional load and envi-ronmental stress conditions of an electronic component and its sub-components. Therefore a formalized communication within the supply chain is necessary for a consistent availability of all relevant data. Dominant loads must be determined and appropriately allocated. One challenge is to consider the influ-ence of singular events on sporadic failures. Another challenge is the different time frame of the product engineering process of OEM, Tier 1 and semiconductor manufacturer. Despite the existence of multiple challenges to derive mission profiles, the mission profiles approach shows great promise to enable the design of robust electronic components for specific applications even in the presence of yet immature technologies.
15:003.8.2MISSION PROFILE AWARE IC DESIGN - A CASE STUDY
Speakers:
Goeran Jerke1 and Andrew Kahng2
1Robert Bosch GmbH, DE; 2University of California, San Diego, USA, US
Abstract
Consistent consideration of mission profiles throughout a supply chain is essential for the development of robust electronic components. Consideration of mission profiles is still mainly a manual task today despite rapidly decreasing robustness margins in modern automotive semiconductor technologies. Mission profile awareness aids the automation of robustness aware design by formalizing and partially automating the generation, transformation, propagation and usage of all component-specific functional loads and environmental conditions for design implementation and validation. In addition, it aids the development of electronic components in yet immature technologies or in technologies with tight parameter variation bounds. This paper introduces the general concept, requirements and context of mission profile aware design. The general design approach is presented along with key differences and enhancements to existing design approaches. A case study focusing on mission profile usage and electromigration failure avoidance is presented to demonstrate various aspects of mission profile aware design.
15:303.8.3MISSION PROFILE AWARE ROBUSTNESS ASSESSMENT OF AUTOMOTIVE POWER DEVICES
Speakers:
Thomas Nirmaier1, Andreas Burger2, Manuel Harrant1, Alexander Viehl2, Oliver Bringmann3, Wolfgang Rosenstiel3 and Georg Pelz1
1Infineon Technologies AG, DE; 2FZI Research Center for Information Technology, DE; 3University of Tuebingen, DE
Abstract
In this paper we propose to exploit so called Mission Profiles to address increasing requirements on safety and power efficiency for automotive power ICs. These Mission Profiles constrain the required device performance space to valid application scenarios. Mission Profile data can be represented in arbitrary forms like temperature histograms or cumulated drive cycle data. Hence, the derivation of realistic verification scenarios on device level requires the generation of environmental properties as e.g. temperatures, board net conditions or currents. For the assessment of real application robustness we present a methodology to extract finite state machines out of measured vehicle data and integrate them in Mission Profiles. Subsequently Markov processes are derived from these finite state machines in order to automatically generate Mission Profile compliant test scenarios for the design and verification process. As a motivating example we show industry fault cases in which missing application fitness to power transient variations finally results in device failure. Verification results based on lab data are outlined and show the benefits of a fully mission profile driven IC verification flow.
15:453.8.4APPLICATION OF MISSION PROFILES TO ENABLE CROSS-DOMAIN CONSTRAINT-DRIVEN DESIGN
Speakers:
Carolin Katzschke1, Marc-Philipp Sohn1, Markus Olbrich1, Volker Meyer zu Bexten2, Markus Tristl2 and Erich Barke1
1Institute of Microelectronic Systems, Leibniz Universit├Ąt Hannover, DE; 2Infineon Technologies AG, DE
Abstract
Mission Profiles contain top-level stress information for the design of future systems. These profiles are refined and transformed to design constraints. We present methods to propagate the constraints between design domains like package and chip. We also introduce a cross-domain methodology for our corresponding constraint transformation system ConDUCT. The proposed methods are demonstrated on the basis of an automotive analog/mixed-signal application.
16:00End of session
Coffee Break in Exhibition Area
On Tuesday-Thursday the coffee and lunch breaks will be located in the Exhibition Area (Terrace Level).